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revan114

Welding

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revan114    1186

So I've been thinking a lot recently about what I want to do, and instead of going to college for four years and racking up shit loads of debt for a Computer Science degree and possibly just getting a shitty entry level job for a long time with meager wages in a field I might not enjoy, I have been finding Welding to be an extremely appealing alternative.

Fucking 12 weeks to 8 months of classes, only $8000, and about $16-22 starting wages straight out the door, in a field with a shortage of workers? Fucking sign me up.

I'm thinking TIG Welding would be the best for me, but I dunno. MIG Welding looks pretty cool too.

Do any of you nerdlings have some experience with Welding? How do you like it? What flavors of Welding have you tried? Ever done work in the field?

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dejordzta    1688

I welded some jewelry together in High School.  Outside of that, like fuck um, parts on a car, no experience. Props to you for your way of thinking, though. We need more people like you that are willing to do the jobs the are in need of.

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117    17

When i was in high school i took Intro to welding honestly it was easy, however i think the fact that i lived in a hick-town and everyone in that class was brain dead and i was the only one there who took Community College outside of HS made the class boring and more like a chore. What i did enjoy was using a Oxy-Acetylene Torch and personally i found stick welding to be enjoyable even though it welds were a bit messy.

Did i enjoy the class, no. Am i glad to have taken the class? Yes, I feel i gained a skill that could one day help me in the future.

Edit: Im not saying its bad its just my circumstances may have made it worse than what it could have been, I am sure if i were in a better class i would have enjoyed it more.

Edited by 117
Clearification

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Legion    543

Definitely don't just limit yourself to TIG, MIG, or Arc welding. The more you diversify yourself the better. At least have a basic use-case with all of them before learning one super in depth.

  • Upvote 1

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Narka    614

Welding is something you have to want to actively improve in to really understand what's happening and enjoy it. Most welding instructors are the "figure it out" type and are pretty much going to force you to cut and inspect your own beads, do your own practice, experiment with materials, etc. before they're going to invest a lot of guidance in you. High schools have basically indoctrinated anybody who's weak-minded or indecisive into that "you must attend college" mindset, so your instructor will reasonably assume that you and your classmates are largely independent and willing to make a lot of "executive decisions."

I went to a hick school; welding and machine shop were kind of the same class, everybody took it, and you ran the whole gamut on the stick (6010, 6013, 7018, etc.), did plenty of MIG, and a little bit of torch for style points. TIG wasn't a requirement, but me and some friends got into it for shits and giggles.

TIG is versatile and a lot of fun, but keep your aspirations in check because it is by and away the most difficult technique to get a handle on, especially to an extent you would be able to do reliable work with. It requires all the same coordination and close attention to the puddle that a lot of people have trouble with when using an oxyacetylene torch, with extra finesse on the pedal to boot. Your filler rod selection, electrode shape, gas settings, etc. are going to make a world of difference. It is a science, and it took me a couple weeks to be able to reliably get *anything* out of a TIG.

MIG is easy to pick up and bang out good beads with. Basically all you need is a steady hand and a little discretion on your feed speed. Of course, there's a fair amount of learned technique I'm leaving out, but it's not as obtuse as a TIG/stick/torch can be. This is what you're going to do all of your long, seamless welds with (boilers, pigs, etc.) and plenty of aluminum, too.

Stick is a good time, but be ready to basically have the game largely redefined whenever you're working with a new rod. 6013 was easy as all hell but 6010 was hard for me and a lot of people to get a handle on and make passable welds with. One girl in my class was able to make insane "stack of dimes" beads with 6010 but never would tell how. The rest of my time spent on the stick was usually pissing with oddball rods we stole when we raided the cabinets for more 6013 (can't tell you enough how much I love 6013).

I honestly cannot tell you what oxyacetylene torches are really good for. I know they are of use in jewelry and some weird metal combinations, but it's a challenging method to use without many applications. I was fairly good at it, but I haven't done it in so long that I probably couldn't even get the torch set up like I could in my heyday-of-sorts. If there's anything to take home from torch welding, it's that you're forced to pay close attention to your puddle while you do it. I always set my helmet to dim less and would basically make puddles with no filler rod just to see what they look like. It took a shitload of experimenting just to realize what a workable puddle is (it's not something you'll necessarily pick up on after seeing it once or twice). Some of the coordination will carry over if you learn it before TIG.

I don't do a huge amount of welding. I've welded up a few trailer hitches, brackets, light structure, etc. but it's nothing I do as a job. It's good that there's people out there who realize there's options outside college, because pretty much every high school in the US would have you believe otherwise.

Edited by BeeJesus
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revan114    1186
1 hour ago, Legion said:

Definitely don't just limit yourself to TIG, MIG, or Arc welding. The more you diversify yourself the better. At least have a basic use-case with all of them before learning one super in depth.

Don't most welding schools have you do basic stuff with most of the types, and then you decide which one you want to commit to?

 

1 hour ago, BeeJesus said:

Welding is something you have to want to actively improve in to really understand what's happening and enjoy it. Most welding instructors are the "figure it out" type and are pretty much going to force you to cut and inspect your own beads, do your own practice, experiment with materials, etc. before they're going to invest a lot of guidance in you. High schools have basically indoctrinated anybody who's weak-minded or indecisive into that "you must attend college" mindset, so your instructor will reasonably assume that you and your classmates are largely independent and willing to make a lot of "executive decisions."

I went to a hick school; welding and machine shop were kind of the same class, everybody took it, and you ran the whole gamut on the stick (6010, 6013, 7018, etc.), did plenty of MIG, and a little bit of torch for style points. TIG wasn't a requirement, but me and some friends got into it for shits and giggles.

TIG is versatile and a lot of fun, but keep your aspirations in check because it is by and away the most difficult technique to get a handle on, especially to an extent you would be able to do reliable work with. It requires all the same coordination and close attention to the puddle that a lot of people have trouble with when using an oxyacetylene torch, with extra finesse on the pedal to boot. Your filler rod selection, electrode shape, gas settings, etc. are going to make a world of difference. It is a science, and it took me a couple weeks to be able to reliably get *anything* out of a TIG.

MIG is easy to pick up and bang out good beads with. Basically all you need is a steady hand and a little discretion on your feed speed. Of course, there's a fair amount of learned technique I'm leaving out, but it's not as obtuse as a TIG/stick/torch can be. This is what you're going to do all of your long, seamless welds with (boilers, pigs, etc.) and plenty of aluminum, too.

Stick is a good time, but be ready to basically have the game largely redefined whenever you're working with a new rod. 6013 was easy as all hell but 6010 was hard for me and a lot of people to get a handle on and make passable welds with. One girl in my class was able to make insane "stack of dimes" beads with 6010 but never would tell how. The rest of my time spent on the stick was usually pissing with oddball rods we stole when we raided the cabinets for more 6013 (can't tell you enough how much I love 6013).

I honestly cannot tell you what oxyacetylene torches are really good for. I know they are of use in jewelry and some weird metal combinations, but it's a challenging method to use without many applications. I was fairly good at it, but I haven't done it in so long that I probably couldn't even get the torch set up like I could in my heyday-of-sorts. If there's anything to take home from torch welding, it's that you're forced to pay close attention to your puddle while you do it. I always set my helmet to dim less and would basically make puddles with no filler rod just to see what they look like. It took a shitload of experimenting just to realize what a workable puddle is (it's not something you'll necessarily pick up on after seeing it once or twice). Some of the coordination will carry over if you learn it before TIG.

I don't do a huge amount of welding. I've welded up a few trailer hitches, brackets, light structure, etc. but it's nothing I do as a job. It's good that there's people out there who realize there's options outside college, because pretty much every high school in the US would have you believe otherwise.

thank you!

Also unrelated,

Bdw0727.jpg

what a bunch of idiots!

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Narka    614
1 hour ago, revan114 said:

Don't most welding schools have you do basic stuff with most of the types, and then you decide which one you want to commit to?

 

thank you!

Also unrelated,

Bdw0727.jpg

what a bunch of idiots!

Believe it or not, I've done that more than I would like to admit with a MIG, since it's basically point and shoot for small tack welds.

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117    17

looking back i may have not taken Chemistry if not for Welding.

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Lynx OGrady    406

Welding is a huge part of the automotive field and as other have pointed out, it has applications anywhere.

MIG is faster in some cases but can give you messy welds (Im sure you've seen these floating around) IF... youre inexperienced or just want to rush it.

58b7fbfa2a18ea8f568182aac4661970.jpg

 

TIG welding, i feel is a bit more time consuming, since the way the material is distributed is controlled by how fast you move it, instead of it being fed out of the tip. On top of that, you have to heat the surface evenly to get a nice evenly distributed flow of welding material. On top of that, if the tungsten tip has a burr on it or has a point that is lop-sided, your weld will look bad or wont penetrate the metal fully. HOWEVER, when done right, it looks great and cleans up easier on the surface

c24897697e3dd0dcffb9c29037e8d48f.jpg

 

Both have their pro's and con's, wether it be time, application or if your finished area is going to be visible, but if you have the patience for it, its a great skill to have

Edited by Lynx OGrady

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