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Saltiren

How to get a job?

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Saltiren    73

Title.

 

I just graduated from High School on the 9th and I've been searching for a job since late March. I have no money for college and that's out of the equation by now so I've been trying to apply for a minimum wage job. I haven't been able to get a single interview and it's getting to the point where I need a job or else I'll pretty much be shit outta luck. I have no previous work experience and no real accomplishments in high school, I've just been a decent student that didn't really do anything. I have no idea what to put on my resume other than "eager to learn, quick learner" ect. I've been applying at McDonalds, Subway, Albertson's, basically any fast food/retail position. I live in Las Vegas, a city of 2 million people so there's so much competition for the minimum wage jobs. I don't know how I'm supposed to get my first job honestly, I have no idea. I don't care how shitty of a job I get, I'm expecting a pretty horrid experience regardless, it's called 'work' for a reason. How did any of you get your first jobs? Any tips on where to apply and what to put on your resume?

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revan114    1186

Mate if I can get a job, anyone can.

 

What I did was I basically waited a week after applying to the jobs, and then I called into them and asked if they received my application or not, and that usually made them pull up the application and look at it. It also shows eagerness to start.

 

Then again I worked at Whataburger, and it was a busy one with a high turn over rate, so...

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iPickedScout    682

Title.

 

I just graduated from High School on the 9th and I've been searching for a job since late March. I have no money for college and that's out of the equation by now so I've been trying to apply for a minimum wage job. I haven't been able to get a single interview and it's getting to the point where I need a job or else I'll pretty much be shit outta luck. I have no previous work experience and no real accomplishments in high school, I've just been a decent student that didn't really do anything. I have no idea what to put on my resume other than "eager to learn, quick learner" ect. I've been applying at McDonalds, Subway, Albertson's, basically any fast food/retail position. I live in Las Vegas, a city of 2 million people so there's so much competition for the minimum wage jobs. I don't know how I'm supposed to get my first job honestly, I have no idea. I don't care how shitty of a job I get, I'm expecting a pretty horrid experience regardless, it's called 'work' for a reason. How did any of you get your first jobs? Any tips on where to apply and what to put on your resume?

 

If you're serious about not minding how horrid the job is, then you're already in a better position than almost everyone else looking for a job. Most people don't want to get their hands dirty, so to speak, and work some of the harder/menial jobs. You have a good attitude about it, seriously. Secondly, Are you physically fit? Stock-room jobs are usually pretty easy to come by, although you'll be doing a lot of lifting and moving. Alcohol stores (if they will let you, in Florida you have to be 18, some places it's 21) are good too, stocking the shelves is heavy work, and, at least the one near me, the women can't do it, so they need to hire men. Essentially, if the first thing you thought of was fast-food jobs, that was the first thing everyone else also thought of, try to find a more obscure job that's still necessary (like stock).

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Saltiren    73

If you're serious about not minding how horrid the job is, then you're already in a better position than almost everyone else looking for a job. Most people don't want to get their hands dirty, so to speak, and work some of the harder/menial jobs. You have a good attitude about it, seriously. Secondly, Are you physically fit? Stock-room jobs are usually pretty easy to come by, although you'll be doing a lot of lifting and moving. Alcohol stores (if they will let you, in Florida you have to be 18, some places it's 21) are good too, stocking the shelves is heavy work, and, at least the one near me, the women can't do it, so they need to hire men. Essentially, if the first thing you thought of was fast-food jobs, that was the first thing everyone else also thought of, try to find a more obscure job that's still necessary (like stock).

I'm decently fit, I mean I'm skinny as hell (5'9", 135lb) but if I had to do something that wasn't playing video games all day I'd probably get stronger. By stocking jobs, do you mean at at places like Walmart, Target, ect? I've been applying to those locations with no luck. Here in Nevada you have to be 21 to work at most locations that sell alcohol, like gas stations.

 

I like the idea Revan stated about calling a place a week after, that's good. I'll definitely use that. Does that also apply if you apply online?

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Narka    614

I'm decently fit, I mean I'm skinny as hell (5'9", 135lb) but if I had to do something that wasn't playing video games all day I'd probably get stronger. By stocking jobs, do you mean at at places like Walmart, Target, ect?

 

I work at a movie theater and get to do plenty of stocking. Leftist Luddites who honestly believe that sexual dimorphism isn't real are retarded; most women at that place can barely move the kernel bags, 3D glasses boxes, pop boxes, etc.

 

Places like Target and Walmart (Walmart especially) are actually quite the racket; Walmart's minimum wage is somewhere around $11 an hour and they have all sorts of employee resources and benefits and shit. Getting a job there can be a tough sell, especially as a teenager. They're not looking for a high turnover.

 

Calling back after turning in an application really helps.

Edited by BeeJesus
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honuchu    112

Calling back after turning in an application really helps.

 

If you're able to drop your resume off at locations in person and follow up within a week later, you can up your chances a whole lot. Drop by a lot of places--go door to door to places checking to see if they are hiring and be ready to ask for an application/drop your resume.

 

I'm not sure about what exactly to put on your resume, as my resume is tailored to IT and video stuff. You're welcome to DM me a copy for formatting if you're really desperate, as I'm not by any means some expert at creating resumes. You may feel like you haven't done a lot in high school but if there's ANYTHING at all that you can write, stick to it. Starting up the sound system at my high school's football stadium and plugging in the quarterback's phone to play music during practices turned into "Stadium Audio Engineer" for me.

 

Congrats on graduating. Best of luck to you!

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iPickedScout    682

I'm decently fit, I mean I'm skinny as hell (5'9", 135lb) but if I had to do something that wasn't playing video games all day I'd probably get stronger. By stocking jobs, do you mean at at places like Walmart, Target, ect? I've been applying to those locations with no luck. Here in Nevada you have to be 21 to work at most locations that sell alcohol, like gas stations.

 

I like the idea Revan stated about calling a place a week after, that's good. I'll definitely use that. Does that also apply if you apply online?

Not necessarily at Walmart, Target, etc. You can get a stock job anywhere, so long as they have products that need to be delivered to the location and placed on shelves. As Bee said, Most women really can't do this, sexism aside. On places like Starbucks they literally have a thing that asks if you can lift 'heavy objects' which for them means 20 lbs. I'm not sure how it is in your city/town/village, but if there are shops that are owned by some older people, family businesses, etc. They usually find it pretty convenient having a younger boy/man doing the lifting for them. They would appreciate it a lot actually.

 

As Revan said, following up with a phone call/showing up in person goes a long way, definitely want to do that wherever you apply. If you have an interview, at the end it's good to ask something along the lines of "When will I hear from you?" as well.

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Keit1h    8

Not necessarily at Walmart, Target, etc. You can get a stock job anywhere, so long as they have products that need to be delivered to the location and placed on shelves. As Bee said, Most women really can't do this, sexism aside. On places like Starbucks they literally have a thing that asks if you can lift 'heavy objects' which for them means 20 lbs. I'm not sure how it is in your city/town/village, but if there are shops that are owned by some older people, family businesses, etc. They usually find it pretty convenient having a younger boy/man doing the lifting for them. They would appreciate it a lot actually.

 

As Revan said, following up with a phone call/showing up in person goes a long way, definitely want to do that wherever you apply. If you have an interview, at the end it's good to ask something along the lines of "When will I hear from you?" as well.

20lbs isn't much, it shouldn't be impossible for even a skinny person to do. While it is pretty heavy if we're talking lifting boxes and stuff, it's manageable for most people. I guess you would have to experiment a bit, find some heavy crap you have in your house and try to lift it.

 

Yeah those warehouse jobs are by far the easiest to come by, just about everywhere doesn't mind having an extra guy helping out in the warehouse as it makes things a lot easier on the establishment. That and there's usually a lack of people who want to do heavy physical work, but I mean if you can manage lifting heavy weights and you want to build muscle then it's probably a great idea.

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DeCoolJB    365

For your resume, there are many things you can fuck up, but getting it all right is another story...

 

The TL;DR/summary: Focus a lot on achievements. Keep everything concise. Make your formatting right. When possible, use evidence of your achievements including teachers willing to vouch for you. And keep everything concise.

 

Firstly, keep it a page at most. Keep wording concise and at a minimum, you don't want your resume to look like a page ripped straight from a novel. Put all of your skills and accomplishments up top/middle. This helps to grab the employer's attention, because they only spend about 5 to 8 seconds looking at a resume. Make sure the formatting is good (this shows your attention to detail). Make everything readable and easy to navigate (putting things in "Skills", "Education", "Experience", and other categories in clear bold print is good. I used separators in my resume also, which helps divide the page out.) If you hand your resume to a hiring manager and they're easily able to tell where your sections are, you did it right. Fonts and other things are open for you to choose, although you wouldn't want to look like a clown and use something like Comic Sans. Try to be conservative mostly with your colors - black text is absolutely fine and encouraged. The thing about formatting is you want it to look good, and most importantly to prove that you're willing to put time and effort into things.

 

Put achievements you did in school. Work experience is also incredibly valuable for this - if you held a job for a while before (which proves that you are reliable), be sure to put that. Don't put stuff like "I'm a hard worker" - everyone, and I mean everyone (who doesn't know what they're doing) says they're a hard worker or whatever, but your accomplishments will prove that. If you're a "quick learner" as you said, try to recall and put down experiences where you were able to learn new tasks quickly and get it accomplished fast. If you can't, try to then say that you're a quick learner and willing to put that skill in good use to learn about new, less-familiar things. There was some Asian kid in an AP calculus class at my school who precisely fit the definition of "quick learner", but spent all of his class time eating snacks and Lunchables and watching movies on his iPad while the teacher did jackshit (not even kidding). He still aced every test, but even though he was successful, don't be that kind of guy. A quick learner who wants to learn new shit is much more appealing to an employer than a quick learner who fucks around and does nothing because everything is easy for them.

 

Use numbers or results when you're able to (this gauges your success). Opportunities where you volunteered for community service and school club memberships are great, so put that down as well as information about what you did (this shows that you're willing to put time into other things). If you're a straight-A student who took college-level classes (such as Advanced Placement or Honors), put that down. It shows that you work hard and successfully in a more difficult/strenuous class environment. If you did it deliberately to improve your skills as well as get the college credits, that's a bonus. If you're proficient in Spanish or another major language, put that down. Who wouldn't want a worker who could provide services to a whole new group of people who can't even speak English fluently? That just means more customers and revenue coming in. Any form of recognition such as awards? Put those down too in a "Recognition" section.

 

Team sports is valuable particularly because it shows that you're able to work as a part of a larger whole, and it serves as a much better substitute for "team player", both literally and as a way to demonstrate your collaborative abilities. If you haven't done any sports (like me) in school, your choices to put here are more limited. When I was in school, there would be many class debates (this is mainly to encourage the validation of opinions, as well as a big fuck you to the "everyone-is-nice-and-shouldn't-fight" incentive that's prevalent in many schools.) This means that usually, everyone is offering an opinion that is sort of aligned to the big idea but conflicts in many ways (much like a parallel to the existence of political parties today, which serve to provide an overarching platform over every conflicting yet conservative/liberal idea). I would usually help offer my ideas as usual, but also act sort of as a leader in constructing every conflicting opinion into a cohesive hole. This was especially useful in a debate where I was in a group of 4 people against a side of 30 people. Despite the odds, by working as part of an entire team we were all able to bolster our confidence. We did very good according to the teacher that day.

 

Got any teachers or other higher-ups vouching for your abilities? Get their contact information and add it to a reference sheet. Maybe ask them for a letter of recommendation if possible. Speaking of references, never add "References available on request" because it's redundant (employers, when they need it, will request your references anyways) The most important thing to get right about a resume is that the employer doesn't care about who you are (e.g. Hard worker, team player, etc etc etc) but what you did, can do, and what makes you different from the crowd of 2.0 GPAs who did not anything seriously.

 

After all of that information is checked off in your resume, I'll stress this point from the first paragraph again:

keep it a page at most. Keep wording concise and at a minimum, you don't want your resume to look like a page ripped straight from a novel.

You'll probably have a whole bunch of stuff. If it goes over 2 pages, trim it down to 1. If you want, use smaller fonts to take advantage of your 1-page real estate, but again, when you can, cut down on redundant wording. It should be a list of skills, experience, and achievements, not a novel or poem.

 

Also, remember that the whole point of a resume is to score the interview. You sell your skills and achievements as a way of proclaiming "Hey, I'm a really good candidate for this job. Give me it!" And if the hiring manager agrees, they'll schedule an interview with you. Good luck man =)

Edited by DeCoolJB
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majesty327    206

-snip-

First thing's first.

Make a good resume. How do you do this? You keep it clean, efficient, to the point, but you also show a bit of your personality and why you'd be a worthy employee.

 

Second, find out what the company wants out of an employee.

Let's say you pick a fancy clothing store. They might expect you to be well-kept, professional, knowledgeable, customer-service oriented, and ambitious. You can easily look up what X company looks for out of an employee. Not to mention you should take a genuine interest in any potential career. Do some research. Figure out the mission statements and goals of a given company. Just to throw it out there, the fast food chain Chipotle prides itself on cage-free eggs, not-GMO produce, no antibiotics, etc.

 

Third, make a cover letter that includes the above, and also shows your interest in the company.

 

Fourth, keep trying. You're not going to be interviewed at every place, and that's okay. If you are, make sure you are presentable, and above all, confident. Employers respect confidence more than anything else.

 

****EDIT****

It doesn't hurt to get some volunteer experience. Show that you're unafraid of work. Do some community service, volunteer in a soup kitchen or a library.

Edited by majesty327
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Saltiren    73

I have to note, I have a bit of a problem actually getting to places that aren't within a few blocks. It's summer here and it gets to 110-120 degrees normally, which if I show up to an employer and see the manager looking like a gross sweaty kid, I don't think that helps my chances (first impressions and all). I can't drive due to the fact I'm actually living with my friend's family who has one car between them already, and my school redacted my driver's ed credit because I moved here partly into the year and apparently "missed too much of the class" despite me passing regardless. So I'd only be able to get a permit. That aside, the transit bus system here in Las Vegas is so awful, it takes 2 hours to get somewhere it would take 45 minutes walking. It severely limits my options, which is why I'm basically considering packing my shit into 2 suitcases and flying north and trying where I used to live.

 

I work at a movie theater and get to do plenty of stocking.

I keep hearing a bunch about movie theatres so I assumed it was similar to the fast food thing where everyone is applying there, but I'll look into that.

 

You may feel like you haven't done a lot in high school but if there's ANYTHING at all that you can write, stick to it. Starting up the sound system at my high school's football stadium and plugging in the quarterback's phone to play music during practices turned into "Stadium Audio Engineer" for me.

 

Congrats on graduating. Best of luck to you!

The only thing I did was go to school and come back. I moved mid-sophomore year and went from a public school that was in the top ~3% of the nation in testing to a very ghetto school, so I guess I got culture-shocked and basically kept to myself the entire time. It's kind of cringy, but I helped a friend set up the video game club this year, no clue what that could even possibly translate to on a resume. I just moved desks and helped move TVs around, and help form the rules list. I honestly didn't think about putting things on my resume at all during my time at high school.

 

I'm not sure how it is in your city/town/village, but if there are shops that are owned by some older people, family businesses, etc. They usually find it pretty convenient having a younger boy/man doing the lifting for them. They would appreciate it a lot actually.

I'll have to look for them, because I don't think I've seen a shop like that here in Vegas. As far as I can tell, this section of the city is around 10-15 years old and just has chain stores surrounded by housing. I'll keep my eye out though.

 

Yeah those warehouse jobs are by far the easiest to come by, just about everywhere doesn't mind having an extra guy helping out in the warehouse as it makes things a lot easier on the establishment. That and there's usually a lack of people who want to do heavy physical work, but I mean if you can manage lifting heavy weights and you want to build muscle then it's probably a great idea.

I have no idea how I would find those places. I've never seen anything around me that looks like a warehouse so I'd probably have to go pretty far to work at one, which would be tricky. I'll remember that though.

 

The TL;DR/summary: Focus a lot on achievements. Keep everything concise. Make your formatting right. When possible, use evidence of your achievements including teachers willing to vouch for you. And keep everything concise.

 

-snip very helpful info-

I think I have my formatting right. I just have no achievements to put. No special classes, no extracurricular activities. I speak only English, which is difficult to land a job against the multitude of Spanish speakers living here. The last time I played a sport was middle school. I didn't ever talk to my teachers during school so I don't think they'd vouch for me. Plus I've graduated and doubt I'd be able to contact them over the summer. This is the problem I've ran into during my job search, my rather barren resume.

 

-snip-

Yeah I've been trying to incorporate their mission statement goals into my resumes when I send them in. Most places I've applied to only ask for a resume and not cover letter. Yeah, keep trying is what I've been doing for four months. I'd appreciate even just one interview, because I'm pretty sure I could get the job if they'd only ask for an interview. I can't get any volunteer experience atm because I need to find a job very soon and I don't think anywhere I volunteer would appreciate me quitting soon after I started because I manage to find a job.

 

Thanks everyone for the helpful advice, I'll consider it all.

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greengreens1    138

The only thing I did was go to school and come back. I moved mid-sophomore year and went from a public school that was in the top ~3% of the nation in testing to a very ghetto school, so I guess I got culture-shocked and basically kept to myself the entire time. It's kind of cringy, but I helped a friend set up the video game club this year, no clue what that could even possibly translate to on a resume. I just moved desks and helped move TVs around, and help form the rules list. I honestly didn't think about putting things on my resume at all during my time at high school.

 

Setting up any type of club is really something that an employer would like to see as it shows an interest and a motivation. You could say that it was "helping to start club with equipment and initial club structure" or something similar. One thing that is important is to show how you are a good worker. As DeCoolJB said, instead of saying that you are a hard worker, say that you are an efficient worker who wants to make sure they do the job right and in a timely matter. It's almost like bragging about yourself but in a nice way.

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blind7125    1924

As DeCoolJB said, instead of saying that you are a hard worker, say that you are an efficient worker who wants to make sure they do the job right and in a timely matter.

 

"What makes you a good employee for this job?"

 

"I've been told I am a hard worker (people recognize me) However, I like to believe I focus on efficiency in my work (Humbles acceptance of buzzword recognition, while substituting for better) Working harder is great, if there isn't a way to work smarter. (Reinforced last point, but said you don't mind effort)

 

Don't replace the piece about being a hard worker, incorporate it instead. You've offered recognition of your work ethic, called out a boring answer, and provided something much more unique in return. Wording is also important.

Edited by blind7125
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dejordzta    1688

I work at a movie theater and get to do plenty of stocking. Leftist Luddites who honestly believe that sexual dimorphism isn't real are retarded; most women at that place can barely move the kernel bags, 3D glasses boxes, pop boxes, etc.

 

Places like Target and Walmart (Walmart especially) are actually quite the racket; Walmart's minimum wage is somewhere around $11 an hour and they have all sorts of employee resources and benefits and shit. Getting a job there can be a tough sell, especially as a teenager. They're not looking for a high turnover.

 

Calling back after turning in an application really helps.

 

+1 for cinema worker. Yay! I'd love to chat about your experiences, see how similar/different they are from mine.

I'd love to chip in on this, but NZ jobs and workplaces, customers, etc could be a whole different ball game to America's, and I'd hate to recommend something that would be god awful because of the differences.

 

I'd definitely agree with DeCoolJB on the resume side of things. As someone who constantly is being handed CV's, and checking them over with my manager, you get to see a lot. Anything over 3 pages is rarely kept, usually straight out. Education (for us at the cinema) isn't a big factor. We have a system called NCEA, long story short is the last 3 years of high school and has a whole bunch of exams where you have to get a certain amount of credits to pass, with 3 levels of passing: Achieved, Merit and Excellence. It's nice to see that people achieve up to NCEA level 2 (some people drop out after NCEA level 2/Year 12 and don't do Year 13 as they go to do internships/apprenticeships etc) but anything more detailed like Passed NCEA level 1 with Excellence, Excellence in Art Design, Drama English and Chemistry, NCEA level 2 with Excellence, Merit in Art Design and English" is just a waste of space.

Tailoring your resume is so important. While, yes, it's good to have a template that has everything on it, if you're applying for a Design job, you'd obviously want to put a lot of effort into the design of it (of course), but taking out anything that's not relevant to the job you're doing. If you studied Design as school, include it. Put previous places you've contracted/worked for, projects you've done, what you're capable with in terms of software, take out anything that's not fitted for your job. At the cinema, we don't care if you can use the Microsoft Office Suite like god knows how many other people that can, or if you can use Photoshop or OpenOffice (no, seriously, we have SO many people list this crap). Can you use a till? Have you handled money before, do you know how to speak to customers and deal with complaints and similar situations? Also, "about me" sections aren't something I've really seen much of on resumes, aside from overseas students/travellers, so personally I'd say keep it veryyyy concise. Don't list what your hobbies are etc, unless you're applying for a game company, in which case, yeah, totally say what you're interests in that area are.

/endrant

 

Also holy shit 20lbs?? Our popcorn seed is 25kgs which is like... 56lbs?? Some of the girls there can't carry it, purely because of the weight and having to lift it so high up onto the bench - fair enough, I'm skinny and have barely any arm muscles, but that's almost hilarious..

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Premiere    61

Look for jobs in places many people wouldn't think to check if you're still searching. I recommend your local school district.

 

I took a year off college this year to travel/figure out what I wanted to major in. After I got back I went to my local school district office and asked for a job. It turned out there was a massive lack of people in this position called "paraprofessional" - a job that was just sitting at one of the local high schools tutoring kids who did poorly in school for over double minimum wage. I spent the rest of the school year working there in an air-conditioned school doing cushy stuff.

You too can do this!

 

I would also strongly recommend keeping your eyes open for scholarship opportunities at colleges (even if it's just a community one) while you work; the value of a good education cannot be snubbed!

 

Edit: You don't actually seem to live in Washington despite your location thing, took out some stuff

Edited by Premiere

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